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Walk & Collect Weekend

During the weekend of the 7th & 8th December, learners from Stanhope set out for a walk with their whanau to collect a bag of rubbish from their local community. This was part of the Walk & Collect Weekend: https://facebook.com/events/s/walk-collect-weekend/521941935297547/?ti=icl 

We felt great doing something to help our planet breathe and the best part is that collectively we made a real difference!








Enviroschools Principles in action here: - Empowered Studentsare enabled to participate in a meaningful way in the life of their early childhood centre or school. Their unique perspectives are valued for the knowledge and insight that they bring, and they are supported to take action for real change. - Sustainable Communities act in ways that nurture people and nature, now and in the future, to maintain the health and viability of our environment, society, culture and economy.
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TREEmendous News

We have a TREEmendous announcement to make! 
But first, some background...

TREEmendous – a joint initiative between the Mazda Foundation and Project Crimson, teaches children about the importance of caring for the environment through the development of amazing outdoor classrooms for teachers and students to reconnect with nature.

The initiative is about encouraging environmental education in schools, along with teaching children and the wider community about the importance of caring for the environment.

Ruud Kleinpaste, the ‘Bugman’, is an ambassador for the project who takes environmental education to the next level at TREEmendous events. Ruud brings his insect friends along and teaches the children about New Zealand’s native bugs and the importance of looking after the environment.

Check out treemendous.org.nz for more information and examples.
In July the Eco-Warriors heard the exciting news that their stage 1 TREEmendous application made it into the top 10 out of the 88 schools who appl…

Harakeke Harvesting

A group of students from Puāwaitanga needed some harakeke (flax) to use in their inquiry learning. Before harvesting, we said a harakeke karakia and the students sang a beautiful waiata. When we harvested, we cut on the diagonal away from the heart of the plant and we took only the Tūpuna (grandparents/ancestors) leaves, not the Matua (parents) or Rito/Pepe (baby) leaves. The students took three leaves to plait into a rope to be used on a waka they had crafted. The trimmings of the harakeke were returned to Papatūānuku and buried beneath the harakeke plant that we harvested from.

Source: National Library




Enviroschools Principles in action here: - Empowered Studentsare enabled to participate in a meaningful way in the life of their early childhood centre or school. Their unique perspectives are valued for the knowledge and insight that they bring, and they are supported to take action for real change. - The principle of Māori Perspectives honours the status of tangata whenua in this land a…

Dry Ice (solid carbon dioxide)

Room 6 students experimented with dry ice during Science Club. Students learned that dry ice was frozen carbon dioxide, the gas we exhale and the gas plants use to make food. We discussed the differences between normal ice (frozen water) and dry ice.  Water freezes at 0 degrees and carbon dioxide becomes a solid at -78 degrees. Students hypothesised about what would happen to the dry ice when placed in cold water vs hot water. They observed bubbles when dry ice was in water and vapour poured off the water. To show that the bubbles were carbon dioxide (air), we placed water and dry ice in a water bottle and quickly attached a balloon to the opening. The dry ice bubbled and the balloon began to inflate. This week the students discussed the experiment further in class and each wrote about the experiment. 

We are so grateful to one of our parents, Colleen Brent, for giving up her time to come in and share her incredible knowledge, expertise and enthusiasm with the students each week at Sci…

The Room 9 Garden Club has been busy

In Whakatōtanga in terms 1 to 3 2019, the Room 9 Garden Club has grown, harvested and eaten a number of vegetables and fruits.

The students pulled a large radish out of the garden. They all pulled together just like in the story, ‘The Gigantic Turnip’! The Garden Club also harvested some celery,
sugar snap peas and salad leaves to take home to share with their whanau.

We enjoyed harvesting our kumara in autumn, it was like digging for buried treasure! One of the kumara was the biggest kumara we had ever seen. We loved eating the kumara chips, they were delicious.


Enviroschools Principles in action here: - Empowered Studentsare enabled to participate in a meaningful way in the life of their early childhood centre or school. Their unique perspectives are valued for the knowledge and insight that they bring, and they are supported to take action for real change. - The principle of Learning for Sustainability recognises the types of teaching and learning that foster student empowerment, decisi…

Chicks!

Whakatōtanga started Term Three 2019 with the arrival of our 9 chicks from The Living Eggs Programme. We loved watching the chicks grow. The two females remained at school and grew quite large before leaving school at the end of the term to go and live on a farm.


Enviroschools Principles in action here: - Empowered Studentsare enabled to participate in a meaningful way in the life of their early childhood centre or school. Their unique perspectives are valued for the knowledge and insight that they bring, and they are supported to take action for real change. - The principle of Learning for Sustainability recognises the types of teaching and learning that foster student empowerment, decision-making, action and sustainable outcomes.


Māori Language Week

Enviroschools Principles in action here: -Empowered Studentsare enabled to participate in a meaningful way in the life of their early childhood centre or school. Their unique perspectives are valued for the knowledge and insight that they bring, and they are supported to take action for real change. - The principle of Māori Perspectives honours the status of tangata whenua in this land and the value of indigenous knowledge in enriching and guiding learning and action. -Sustainable Communities act in ways that nurture people and nature, now and in the future, to maintain the health and viability of our environment, society, culture and economy.